This block is broken or missing. You may be missing content or you might need to enable the original module.

Alexandria

The First Roman – Jewish War

Course
Roman Palestine
Lecture
1011 Lecture 11
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
July 8, 2010
SortOrder
012

The Romans entered Judean politics, ironically, by invitation of one Jewish faction that was in a power struggle with another. In 76 BCE Alexander Jannaeus, the last great king of the Hasmonean line, died. He was succeeded by his widow Salome Alexandra, who herself died in 67 BCE The royal couple’s two sons, Hyrcanus and Aristobulus, then fought each other for succession to the throne.

The Christian Chronology – 1st Century Mail Stones

Course
Early Christianity
Lecture
1012 TL1
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
SortOrder
007

14 – Augustus died on August 19 – On September 17, the Senate in Rome decreed that Augustus Caesar was one of the gods, and it named Tiberius emperor. (If Luke 3.1 dates “the reign of Tiberius Caesar” from this year, his fifteenth year was 28/29 CE.)

30/ 33?Jesus was crucified and resurrected.

Hasmonean Religious Ideology

Course
Roman Palestine
Lecture
1011 Lecture 1
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
June 14, 2010
SortOrder
001

In the religious sphere, the Hasmoneans were committed to ridding their territories of all idolatrous practices. Religious purification of the land became a basic policy. Sometimes this meant driving out pagan inhabitants altogether and then purifying the site; at other times, conversion of the populace was required. Entire populations, both urban and rural, were thus brought into the Jewish fold. The two outstanding examples of this policy were the conversion of the Idumeans by John Hyrcanus and the conversion of the Itureans by Aristobulus I.

HB/OT Apocrypha: Letter of Aristeas

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 24, 2009

The so-called Letter of Aristeas or Letter to Philocrates [1]  is a Hellenistic work of the second century BCE, one of the Pseudepigrapha. Josephus Flavius who rephrases some of the letter, ascribes it to Aristeas and written to Philocrates, describing the Greek translation of the Hebrew Law by seventy-two interpreters sent into Egypt from Jerusalem at the request of the librarian of Alexandria, resulting in the Septuagint translation.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
202

Septuagint, the first Bible translation – 1

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 16, 2009

It often comes as a surprise to laypeople to learn that ancient copies of the Bible vary, sometimes in minor ways, but sometimes, also, in important ways. Variation exists between any two manuscripts of the Bible, even when they are written in the same language. But apart from minor variations among ancient manuscripts, when all the evidence from antiquity is compared, two important traditions of the biblical text emerge. They are the Masoretic text and the Septuagint.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
181