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Ebla

Ebla

Jerusalem in the Persian Period – 2

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
November 16, 2009

We may now turn to the city wall of the Persian period restored by the returning exiles. As we have seen, the minimalists (including such eminent archaeologists and scholars as the late Michael Avi-Yonah, Yoram Tsafrir of Hebrew University, Hugh Williamson of Oxford University, Hanan Eshel of Bar-Ilan University and Ephraim Stern of Hebrew University) limit the wall of Persian period Jerusalem to the City of David.

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
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ANE – Ebla / 1

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
May 27, 2009

A Short History of Ebla

Ebla (Tell Mardikh, Syria) was an ancient city about 56 km southwest of Aleppo. It was an important city-state in two periods, first in the late third millennium BCE, then again between 1800 and 1650 BCE. The site is most famous for the archive of about 15,000 cuneiform tablets found there [1] , dated from around 2250 BCE, written in the Sumerian language and in Eblaite — a previously unknown Semitic language.

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ANE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Ancient Near East
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ANE – Ebla / 2 – End

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
May 28, 2009

Eblaite language

Eblaite language (also known as Eblan) is an extinct, perhaps East Semitic language, which was spoken in the 3rd. millennium BCE in the ancient city of Ebla, in modern Syria. It is considered to be the oldest written Semitic language. The language, closely related to Akkadian, is known from about 17,000 tablets written with cuneiform script which were found between 1974 and 1976 in the ruins of the city of Ebla (Tell Mardikh).

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ANE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Ancient Near East
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ANE – Mari / 2

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
May 31, 2009

Archeological Findings at Mari

The Mari Tablets are a large group of tablets discovered by French archaeologists in the 1930’s. More than 23,000 tablets were found, which gave information about the kingdom of Mari including the customs of the Mari kingdom, as well as giving names of people who lived during that time .

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ANE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Ancient Near East
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