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Hyksos

Hyksos

Jacob, Who ? – 1

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 2, 2009

Manetho and Josephus Flavius

By vocation Manetho was an Egyptian priest associated with the cult of Serapis. He was not only well versed in the high Greek culture of his day, but he was also thoroughly familiar with Egyptian lore and could read hieroglyphics. He was the first Egyptian to write a history of his country in Greek.

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - The Patriarchal Stories
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051

Jacob, Who ? – 2

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 3, 2009

The two kings in Manetho’s list that scholars have not been able to corroborate from names on monuments or other objects are the first two, Salitis and Bnon. Some scholars have suggested that Manetho’s Bnon may be a ruler of the contemporaneous XVIth Dynasty whom Manetho incorrectly placed in the XVth Dynasty.

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - The Patriarchal Stories
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052

The Hyksos

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 5, 2009

The origin of the term “Hyksos” derives from the Egyptian expression heka khasewet (”rulers of foreign lands”), used in Egyptian texts such as the Turin King List to describe the rulers of neighbouring lands. This expression begins to appear as early as the late Old Kingdom in Egypt, referring to various Nubian chieftains, and as early as the Middle Kingdom, referring to the Semitic chieftains of Syria and Canaan.

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ANE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Ancient Near East
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081

The Exodus Saga – 2

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 9, 2009

 

Manetho, a priest who wrote a history of Egypt in the third century BCE, placed Joseph’s entry into Egypt and his rise in the early part of the reign of the Hyksos king, Apophis. The Hyksos were expelled, and then Moses called them back to help the later Israelites escape from Egypt (see the Hyksos articles).

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - The Patriarchal Stories
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112

The Exodus Saga – 4

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 15, 2009

The oldest Israelite literature about the Exodus from Egypt and the conquest of Canaan, the Song of the Sea in Exodus 15, describes Israel’s entry into Canaan in the following terms:

“The peoples heard, they trembled:
Writhing seized the inhabitants of Philistia;
Then, the chieftains of Edom were discomfited;
The chiefs of Moab—terror seized them.
All the inhabitants of Canaan melted away.” Exodus 15:14–15 [1]

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - The Patriarchal Stories
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114

The Exodus Saga – 5 / 5

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
August 16, 2009

Some of the Semitic migrants found their way not just into southern Syria and Transjordan, [1]  but into the central hills of Cisjordan. Merneptah mentions this group in the celebrated Israel Stele. Some of the evidence from the material culture suggests that the early Israelites enjoyed some familiarity with Canaanite culture. Still, most of the evidence linking the collared-rim jar, for example, to Canaanite towns, is susceptible to explanation on the basis of trade.

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BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - The Patriarchal Stories
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