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Septuagint

Septuagint (LXX)

A New Beginning and the Final Division

Course
Early Christianity
Lecture
1012 Lecture 12
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
July 14, 2010
SortOrder
016

The years following Jesus until the death of the last of the Twelve Apostles,  the Christian Church came fully into being on Pentecost when, according to scriptural accounts, the apostles received the Holy Spirit and emerged from hiding following the death and resurrection of Jesus to preach and spread his message. The apostolic period produced writings attributed to the direct followers of Jesus Christ and is traditionally associated with the apostles and apostolic times.

Apocalyptic Scriptures

Course
Roman Palestine
Lecture
1011 Lecture 9
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
July 5, 2010
SortOrder
010

Only one book in the Hebrew Bible is generally classified as apocalyptic literature, and that is the book of Daniel. But that is not to say that Daniel is the only book that shows characteristics typical of apocalyptic literature. Certain motifs characteristic of apocalyptic eschatology can be found in the myths of ancient Mesopotamia. Motifs of cosmic warfare pervade mythic material, such as the battle between the high gods and the sea monsters. This divine warrior motif is also present in biblical apocalyptic literature.

The Intertestamental Period – Glossary of Terms

Course
Roman Palestine
Lecture
1011 Glossary
Source
http://politeacademics.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
SortOrder
007

The period 200 BC to 200 CE was a time of history-making changes in Jewish culture and religious and political philosophy. It also harbors the beginnings of the development of Christian philosophy, culture and beliefs. For these reasons events of that period still exerts considerable influence on large segments of Western philosophy and culture today. That is what makes it such an interesting period to study.

The Age of Hellenism–2 / Jewish Reaction

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 31, 2009

It is difficult to assess how Jewish society as a whole responded to this new reality. Did the isolated geographical circumstances of Jews (who lived primarily in the more remote hill country of Judea), combined with ethnic and religious differences, create a buffer between them and the outside world? Or were Jews affected by these changes in the same ways as were their pagan counterparts in the coastal cities, albeit at a somewhat slower pace? Unfortunately, our sources cannot answer these questions adequately.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
122

HB/OT Apocrypha: Letter of Aristeas

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 24, 2009

The so-called Letter of Aristeas or Letter to Philocrates [1]  is a Hellenistic work of the second century BCE, one of the Pseudepigrapha. Josephus Flavius who rephrases some of the letter, ascribes it to Aristeas and written to Philocrates, describing the Greek translation of the Hebrew Law by seventy-two interpreters sent into Egypt from Jerusalem at the request of the librarian of Alexandria, resulting in the Septuagint translation.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
202

Major Septuagint Manuscripts — Vaticanus, Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 21, 2009

Readers of Bible commentaries and articles on the Bible are often informed by learned authors that a particular word or phrase is found in the Septuagint—and that, therefore, the Septuagint substantiates the learned author’s point.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
185

Septuagint, the first Bible translation – 1

Source
http://theophyle.wordpress.com
Author
Theophyle
Original Date
December 16, 2009

It often comes as a surprise to laypeople to learn that ancient copies of the Bible vary, sometimes in minor ways, but sometimes, also, in important ways. Variation exists between any two manuscripts of the Bible, even when they are written in the same language. But apart from minor variations among ancient manuscripts, when all the evidence from antiquity is compared, two important traditions of the biblical text emerge. They are the Masoretic text and the Septuagint.

Book
BCE Articles from Theophyle's English Blog - Babylon and the Second Temple Period
SortOrder
181